Skip to main content Rasmussen College Online Library

*School of Health Sciences*

Library and Learning Services information hub for all things School of Health Sciences.

Physical Therapist Assistant

Welcome to the Physical Therapist Assistant guide!

If you have questions or comments about this guide, please contact Emily Gilbert, Librarian for the School of Health Sciences, or Anna Phan, Learning Services Coordinator for the School of Health Sciences.

For career information, please see the Physical Therapist Assistant tab on the Career Information page in this guide.

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION

The following documents provide more information on the program and immunization or certification requirements. 

Graduation from a physical therapist assistant education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone; 703-706-3245; accreditation@apta.org is necessary for eligibility to sit for the licensure examination, which is required in all states.

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Rasmussen College – Brooklyn Park/Maple Grove is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org . If needing to contact the program/institution directly, please call 763-496-6022 or email Matthew.Vraa@rasmussen.edu .

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Rasmussen College – Land O’ Lakes/East Pasco is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org . If needing to contact the program/institution directly, please call (813) 435-3645 or email Tania.Tablinsky@rasmussen.edu .

Rasmussen College – Ocala is seeking accreditation of a new physical therapist assistant education program from CAPTE. On May 31, the program submitted an Application for Candidacy, which is the formal application required in the pre-accreditation stage. Submission of this document does not assure that the program will be granted Candidate for Accreditation status. Achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status is required prior to implementation of the technical phase of the program; therefore, no students may be enrolled in technical courses until Candidate for Accreditation status has been achieved. Further, though achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status signifies satisfactory progress toward accreditation, it does not assure that the program will be granted accreditation.

PROGRAMMATIC CONTINGENCY PLANS

CANDIDACY CONTINGENCY PLAN

Rasmussen College has a contingency plan in place should the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program not receive Candidacy for Accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). Students enrolled in the PTA program are not eligible to start technical courses until Candidacy for Accreditation has been granted by CAPTE. If candidacy is not achieved, students will be notified of the program status and advised of other programs offered at Rasmussen College.

ACCREDITATION CONTINGENCY PLAN

Rasmussen College has a contingency plan in place should the PTA program not receive Accreditation from CAPTE. Students who are enrolled in the PTA program will be notified if an adverse decision on accreditation is received by CAPTE, and at that point no new students will be enrolled into the program until accreditation can be achieved.

Students enrolled in the PTA program at the time of an adverse decision on accreditation by CAPTE will be offered the option of completing their current coursework. Students will have the option of remaining in the PTA program until a final decision regarding the PTA program accreditation status is received from CAPTE. Students not opting to stay in the program will receive assistance to identify an accredited PTA program for consideration of transfer.

Graduation from a physical therapist assistant education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone; 703-706-3245; accreditation@apta.org is necessary for eligibility to sit for the licensure examination, which is required in all states.

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Rasmussen College – Brooklyn Park/Maple Grove is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org . If needing to contact the program/institution directly, please call 763-496-6022 or email Matthew.Vraa@rasmussen.edu .

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Rasmussen College – Land O’ Lakes/East Pasco is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org . If needing to contact the program/institution directly, please call (813) 435-3645 or email Tania.Tablinsky@rasmussen.edu .

Rasmussen College – Ocala is seeking accreditation of a new physical therapist assistant education program from CAPTE. On May 31, the program submitted an Application for Candidacy, which is the formal application required in the pre-accreditation stage. Submission of this document does not assure that the program will be granted Candidate for Accreditation status. Achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status is required prior to implementation of the technical phase of the program; therefore, no students may be enrolled in technical courses until Candidate for Accreditation status has been achieved. Further, though achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status signifies satisfactory progress toward accreditation, it does not assure that the program will be granted accreditation.

PROGRAMMATIC CONTINGENCY PLANS

CANDIDACY CONTINGENCY PLAN

Rasmussen College has a contingency plan in place should the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program not receive Candidacy for Accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). Students enrolled in the PTA program are not eligible to start technical courses until Candidacy for Accreditation has been granted by CAPTE. If candidacy is not achieved, students will be notified of the program status and advised of other programs offered at Rasmussen College.

ACCREDITATION CONTINGENCY PLAN

Rasmussen College has a contingency plan in place should the PTA program not receive Accreditation from CAPTE. Students who are enrolled in the PTA program will be notified if an adverse decision on accreditation is received by CAPTE, and at that point no new students will be enrolled into the program until accreditation can be achieved.

Students enrolled in the PTA program at the time of an adverse decision on accreditation by CAPTE will be offered the option of completing their current coursework. Students will have the option of remaining in the PTA program until a final decision regarding the PTA program accreditation status is received from CAPTE. Students not opting to stay in the program will receive assistance to identify an accredited PTA program for consideration of transfer.

eBooks from EBSCO has a nice collection of books on physical therapy topics.

  • Click on this search link to get an up-to-date list of resources with the words "physical therapy" in them.
  • Browse the titles listed below for examples.

The Discovery All-in-One search draws results from a wide variety of databases at once, and contains journals such as:

  • Physical Therapy: Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association
  • PT: Magazine of Physical Therapy
  • PT in Motion
  • Physiotherapy: Theory and Practice
  • and many more!

Additional journals can be found in Health Sciences & Nursing via ProQuest, including:

  • Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal
  • Journal of Physical Therapy Education
  • Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy
  • Physical Therapy in Sport

The videos below give some examples of how to create a search string and refine results, but if you run into any problems you can always chat with a librarian to get help.

The National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE) for Physical Therapist Assistants is an essential part of the licensing process. You can see more information about the NPTE at the link below:

 

Want some help studying for your National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE)?  

Rasmussen provides Learning Express to help you!

You can find the Learning Express Library in the A-Z Database list.  Select L from the top of the screen and look for Learning Express.

From the homepage, you can explore all of the different areas of learning available to you.



In the Career Preparation area, you can learn more about a career, prepare for an entrance exam, prepare for an occupation exam like the NPTE, and more!

Click Prepare for an occupation exam, and then select the option for Physical Therapist Assistant exam.

Flashcards are a fabulous way to test your knowledge and identify where you may need additional practice.  For tips on how to create and effectively use flashcards, watch the quick 10-minute video below.  For resources to create your own flashcards, click here or check out the links below the video.


Mobile Apps

Loading ...

Database Search Tips

  

  • Library databases are collections of resources, including full-text articles, books, and encyclopedias, that are searchable.
  • Searching library databases is different than searching Google. Best results are achieved when using Keywords linked with Boolean Operators
  • Applying Limiters such as full-text, publication date, resource type, language, geographic location, and subject help to refine search results.
  • Utilizing Phrases or Fields, in addition to an awareness of Stop Words, can focus your search and retrieve more useful results.
  • Have questions? Connect with a Librarian through the Library Live Chat for assistance.

Boolean Operators connect keywords or concepts logically to retrieve relevant articles, books, and other resources.  There are three Boolean Operators:

  • AND
  • OR
  • NOT

Using AND 

  • Narrows search results
  • Connects two or more keywords/concepts
  • All keywords/concepts connected with "and" must be in an article or resource to appear in the search results list

Example: The result list will include resources that include both keywords -- "distracted driving" and "texting" -- in the same article or resource, represented in the shaded area where the circles intersect (area shaded in purple).

Using OR

  • Broadens search results ("OR means more!")
  • Connects two or more synonyms or related keywords/concepts
  • Resources appearing in the results list will include any of the terms connected with the OR connector

Example:  The result list will include resources that include the keyword "texting" OR the keyword "cell phone" (entire area shaded in blue); either is acceptable.

Using NOT

  • Excludes keywords or concepts from the search
  • Narrows results by removing resources that contain the keyword or term connect with the NOT connector
  • Use sparingly

Example: The result list will include all resources that includes the term "car" (green area) but will exclude any resource that includes the term "motorcycle" (purple area) even though the term car may be present in the resource.

A library database searches for keywords throughout the entire resource record including the full-text of the resource, subject headings, tags, bibliographic information, etc.

Keywords:

  • Natural language words or short phrases that describe a concept or idea
  • Can retrieve too few or irrelevant results due to full-text searching (What words would an author use to write about this topic?)
  • Provide flexibility in a search
  • Must consider synonyms or related terms to improve search results
  • TIP: Build a Keyword List

Example:  The keyword list above was developed to find resources that discuss how texting while driving results in accidents.  Notice that there are synonyms (texting and "text messaging"), related terms ("cell phones" and texting), and spelling variations ("cell phone" and cellphone).  Using keywords when searching full-text requires consideration of various words that express an idea or concept.

Subject Headings

  • Predetermined "controlled vocabulary" database editors apply to resources to describe topical coverage of content
  • Can retrieve more precise search results because every article assigned that subject heading will be retrieved.
  • Provide less flexibility in a search
  • Can be combined with a keyword search to focus search results.
  • TIP: Consult database subject heading list or subject headings assigned to relevant resources

Example 1: In EBSCO's Academic Search Complete, clicking on the "Subject Terms" tab provides access to the entire subject heading list used in the database.  It also allows a search for specific subject terms.

 

Example 2:  A subject term can be incorporated into a keyword search by clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" and selecting "Subject Terms" from the dropdown list.  Also, notice how subject headings are listed below the title of the resource providing another strategy for discovering subject headings used in the database.

When a search term is more than one word, enclose the phrase in quotation marks to retrieve more precise and accurate results.  Using quotation marks around a term will search it as a "chunk," searching for those particular words together in that order within the text of a resource. 

Examples:

"cell phone"

"distracted driving"

"car accident"

TIP: In some databases, neglecting to enclose phrases in quotation marks will insert the AND Boolean connector between each word resulting in unintended search results.

 

Truncation provides an option to search for a root of a keyword in order to retrieve resources that include variations of that word.  This feature can be used to broaden search results, although some results may not be relevant.  To truncate a keyword, type an asterisk (*) following the root of the word.

For example:

 

Library databases provide a variety of tools to limit and refine search results.  Limiters provide the ability to limit search results to resources having specified characteristics including:

  • Full text
  • Resource type
  • Publication date
  • Language
  • Geographic location
  • Subject

In both the EBSCO and ProQuest databases, the limiting tools are located in the left panel of the results page.

                                                 EBSCO                                                     ProQuest

         

The short video below provides a demonstration of how to use limiters to refine a list of search results.

Each resource in a library database is stored in a record.  In addition to the full-text of the resources, searchable Fields are attached that typically include:

  • Author
  • Title
  • Journal title
  • Date of Publication
  • Abstract
  • Subject Headings
  • Publisher

Incorporating Fields into your search can assist in focusing and refining search results by limiting the results to those resources that include specific information in a particular field.

In both EBSCO and ProQuest databases, selecting the Advanced Search option will allow Fields to be included in a search.

For example, in the Advanced Search option in EBSCO's Academic Search Complete database, clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" provides a list of fields that can be searched within that database.  Select the field and enter the information in the text box to the left to use this feature.

Stop words are short, commonly used words--articles, prepositions, and pronouns-- that are automatically dropped from a search.  Typical stop words include:

  • a
  • an
  • and
  • the
  • also
  • but
  • for
  • in
  • is
  • of
  • so
  • which
  • when
  • was

In library databases, a stop word will not be searched even if it is included in a phrase enclosed in quotation marks.  In some instances, a word will be substituted for the stop word to allow for the other words in the phrase to be searched in proximity to one another within the text of the resource.

For example, if you searched company of America, your result list will include these variatons:

  • company in America
  • company of America
  • company for America

This short video demonstrates how to create a search string -- keywords connected with Boolean operators -- to use in a library database search to retrieve relevant resources for any research assignment.

Loading ...