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IMPORTANT NOTICE FROM AHIMA REGARDING CERTIFICATION EXAM TESTING RELATED TO COVID-19

As COVID-19 (Coronavirus) continues to spread globally, AHIMA’s  highest priority is health and welfare. AHIMA is currently taking proactive measures regarding the delivery of our exams. Please refer to the link below to obtain those measures, and for any updates regarding test delivery information.  

Please continue to check the link below for any additions or changes on a regular basis as you prepare to schedule your exams and prior to taking them.

https://ahima.org/certification/

Archive: HIP Week (April 20-22, 2021)

Rasmussen University Medical Billing Coding Certification, Health Information Technician Associate Degree, and Health Information Management Bachelor’s Degree Programs want to invite you to join us for some special events as we celebrate 2021 HIPWeek. We have planned to celebrate the dedicated Coding and HIM Professionals who make a difference.  We also want to salute  our students and graduates who are the future dedicated professionals making a difference. You don’t have to be experienced or mastering coding; we want you to join us, share in the experience, share and learn something. This year, we’re looking at Skilled Nursing Facilities and Long Term Care as an excellent career path for HIM Professionals. We look forward to seeing you.

Date

Time

Topic

Presenter(s) and Link

Tuesday

4/20/2021

12-12:45 pm

Hospitals aren’t the only place to work:  Another HIM Career Path SNF/LTC

Kelly F. Cooper, CHPS, RHIA, CCS

Health Information and HIPAA Corporate Compliance Officer

Solaris Clinical Consulting, Naples, FL

Charlee Bumgardner, MLS, RHIT

National Online HIT Program Coordinator/Associate Professor

Recording

Wednesday

4/21/2021

12-12:15 pm

Building Your Personal Brand:  How to Create Your Elevator Pitch!

Joni Rudd, MHA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator

Kyra Austin, MA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator/Associate Professor
Recording

12:15-12:30 pm

21st Century Cures Act:  New Information Blocking

Denise Garr VanFleet, MS, RHIA

Department Chair - School of Health Sciences

Recording - Not Available

Thursday

4/22/2021

12 – 12:30 pm

Coding Round Table Topics:  Oncology, Coding and Career in Cancer Registry*

Bonnie Moore, BA, RHIT

HIT Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor

Sandy Stevens-Berens, MS, RHIT

HIT Program Coordinator 
Recording - Not Available

 

This is AHIMA’s 23rd year promoting Health Information Professionals’ (HIPWeek) Week and continues as an annual event  as a way to recognize the amazing work being done in the health care field by coding and health information management professionals. 

IMPACT:  Influencing Our Global Healthcare Ecosystem, One Patient at A Time  (Source:  AHIMA, 2021)

Positioned at the intersection of healthcare, technology, and business, professionals in the health information space possess a uniquely comprehensive view of a resource critical to meaningful health innovation. In medical coding, clinical documentation integrity, data analytics, management, privacy, security, and beyond, we empower our partners in healthcare to provide high-quality, lifesaving care.

As the definition of healthcare continues to evolve, the accuracy, integrity, protection, and accessibility of health information remain our priority. Our work ensures patients receive the high-quality care they need, informs the development of new treatments and technologies, and empowers leaders to make effective strategic decisions.

Read about health information professionals influencing the healthcare ecosystem below or share your own stories here.

Organizations of all types recognize and champion the work of health information professionals. Browse them here.

PERSPECTIVES:  Advocating For the Issues that Help Us Live Healthier Lives  (Source:  AHIMA, 2021)

While our patients don’t often see us, we see our patients in a way no other healthcare professional does. Health information professionals see the person connected to the data, ensuring their information stays human—because when information stays human, it stays relevant.

Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) and Patient Identification Matching are two critical issues affecting health information professionals and the wider healthcare community. Read about AHIMA’s perspective on these issues below and learn how you can join them in advocating for support.

INNOVATION:  Advancing our mission to empower people to impact health  (Source:  AHIMA, 2021)

From patient care portals that allow real-time diagnosis, to wearable technology that permits consumers to track their fitness level, to groundbreaking research that informs lifesaving treatments—accurate, complete, protected, accessible health information is at the heart of our most effective health innovations.

Health information professionals ensure the person in front of the data remains connected to their information at every touchpoint. This perspective empowers our partners in innovation to develop solutions that not only move technology and business forward, but also enrich the lives of people everywhere.

Health Information Technology (HIT) & Management (HIM)


Welcome to the Health Information Technology (HIT) and Management (HIM) guide!

If you have questions or comments about this guide, please contact Emily Gilbert, Librarian for the School of Health Sciences, or Anna Phan, Learning Services Coordinator for the School of Health Sciences.

For career information, please see the following tabs on the Career Information page of this guide:
Health Information Management
Health Information Technology

Most of our eBooks can be found in the eBooks and Academic Books via EBSCO collection, and we are also building a collection in Ebrary. You can click into either database to search. 

For your convenience, a sampling of eBooks related to general health information technology and health information management can be accessed via the links below. 

Most of our eBooks can be found in the eBooks and Academic Books via EBSCO collection, and we are also building a collection in Ebrary. You can click into either database to search. 

For your convenience, a sampling of eBooks related to coding can be accessed via the links below. 

Most of our eBooks can be found in the eBooks and Academic Books via EBSCO collection, and we are also building a collection in Ebrary. You can click into either database to search. 

For your convenience, a sampling of eBooks related to revenue cycle and billing can be accessed via the links below. 

The article below from AHIMA is also an excellent resource for learning about the revenue cycle.

Most of our eBooks can be found in the eBooks and Academic Books via EBSCO collection, and we are also building a collection in Ebrary. You can click into either database to search. 

For your convenience, a sampling of eBooks related to HIPAA, compliance, privacy, and security can be accessed via the links below. 

Need help registering for the AHIMA Virtual Lab? Check out this great tutorial from HIT Program Coordinator Eunice Carlson!

Creating an account in the AHIMA Virtual Lab

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) is celebrating National Health Information Professionals’ Week - (HIPWeek) –

October 11 – 17, 2020.  This year our national theme is:

Rasmussen College Medical Billing Coding Certification, Health Information Technician Associate Degree and Health Information Management Bachelor Degree Programs want to invite you to join us for some special events that we have planned to celebrate the dedicated Coding and HIM Professionals who make a difference and to our students and graduates who are the future dedicated professionals making a difference..  You don’t have to be experienced or mastering coding, we just want you to come join us, share in the coding experience, share and learn something.  We look forward to seeing you.

Topic

Presenter(s) and Link

Coding Round Table TopicHCC Coding*

Linda Feshami, MSHI, RHIA, CHC, CDIP, CRC, AHIMA Approved ICD-10 CM/PCS Trainer|

HIT Program Coordinator/Associate Professor

Krystal Hardy, MHA, RHIA, CRC

Recording

Career Tip:  How to use a Virtual Job Fair to advance your job search

Kyra Austin, MA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator/Associate Professor

Amy Ites | Senior Career Services Advisor

Recording

Career Tip:  Where to look for Jobs? 

Joni Rudd, MHA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator

Laura Larsen | HIT Program Coordinator

Amy Ites | Senior Career Services Advisor

<Recording is not available for this session>

Career Tips:  How to take your resume from Blah to Wow!

Sandra L Stevens-Berens, MS RHIT,

HIT Program Coordinator

Charlee Bumgardner, MLS, RHIT

National & Kansas (Interim) Online HIT Program Coordinator

Joni Rudd, MHA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator

Amy Ites | Senior Career Services Advisor

Recording

Coding Round Table Topics:  Inpatient PCS Coding*

Kyra Austin, MA, RHIA

HIT Program Coordinator/Associate Professor

Bonnie Moore, BA, RHIT

HIT Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor

Recording

Database Search Tips

  

  • Library databases are collections of resources, including full-text articles, books, and encyclopedias, that are searchable.
  • Searching library databases is different than searching Google. Best results are achieved when using Keywords linked with Boolean Operators
  • Applying Limiters such as full-text, publication date, resource type, language, geographic location, and subject help to refine search results.
  • Utilizing Phrases or Fields, in addition to an awareness of Stop Words, can focus your search and retrieve more useful results.
  • Have questions? Connect with a Librarian through the Library Live Chat for assistance.

Boolean Operators connect keywords or concepts logically to retrieve relevant articles, books, and other resources.  There are three Boolean Operators:

  • AND
  • OR
  • NOT

Using AND 

  • Narrows search results
  • Connects two or more keywords/concepts
  • All keywords/concepts connected with "and" must be in an article or resource to appear in the search results list

Example: The result list will include resources that include both keywords -- "distracted driving" and "texting" -- in the same article or resource, represented in the shaded area where the circles intersect (area shaded in purple).

Using OR

  • Broadens search results ("OR means more!")
  • Connects two or more synonyms or related keywords/concepts
  • Resources appearing in the results list will include any of the terms connected with the OR connector

Example:  The result list will include resources that include the keyword "texting" OR the keyword "cell phone" (entire area shaded in blue); either is acceptable.

Using NOT

  • Excludes keywords or concepts from the search
  • Narrows results by removing resources that contain the keyword or term connect with the NOT connector
  • Use sparingly

Example: The result list will include all resources that includes the term "car" (green area) but will exclude any resource that includes the term "motorcycle" (purple area) even though the term car may be present in the resource.

A library database searches for keywords throughout the entire resource record including the full-text of the resource, subject headings, tags, bibliographic information, etc.

Keywords:

  • Natural language words or short phrases that describe a concept or idea
  • Can retrieve too few or irrelevant results due to full-text searching (What words would an author use to write about this topic?)
  • Provide flexibility in a search
  • Must consider synonyms or related terms to improve search results
  • TIP: Build a Keyword List

Example:  The keyword list above was developed to find resources that discuss how texting while driving results in accidents.  Notice that there are synonyms (texting and "text messaging"), related terms ("cell phones" and texting), and spelling variations ("cell phone" and cellphone).  Using keywords when searching full-text requires consideration of various words that express an idea or concept.

Subject Headings

  • Predetermined "controlled vocabulary" database editors apply to resources to describe topical coverage of content
  • Can retrieve more precise search results because every article assigned that subject heading will be retrieved.
  • Provide less flexibility in a search
  • Can be combined with a keyword search to focus search results.
  • TIP: Consult database subject heading list or subject headings assigned to relevant resources

Example 1: In EBSCO's Academic Search Complete, clicking on the "Subject Terms" tab provides access to the entire subject heading list used in the database.  It also allows a search for specific subject terms.

 

Example 2:  A subject term can be incorporated into a keyword search by clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" and selecting "Subject Terms" from the dropdown list.  Also, notice how subject headings are listed below the title of the resource providing another strategy for discovering subject headings used in the database.

When a search term is more than one word, enclose the phrase in quotation marks to retrieve more precise and accurate results.  Using quotation marks around a term will search it as a "chunk," searching for those particular words together in that order within the text of a resource. 

Examples:

"cell phone"

"distracted driving"

"car accident"

TIP: In some databases, neglecting to enclose phrases in quotation marks will insert the AND Boolean connector between each word resulting in unintended search results.

 

Truncation provides an option to search for a root of a keyword in order to retrieve resources that include variations of that word.  This feature can be used to broaden search results, although some results may not be relevant.  To truncate a keyword, type an asterisk (*) following the root of the word.

For example:

 

Library databases provide a variety of tools to limit and refine search results.  Limiters provide the ability to limit search results to resources having specified characteristics including:

  • Full text
  • Resource type
  • Publication date
  • Language
  • Geographic location
  • Subject

In both the EBSCO and ProQuest databases, the limiting tools are located in the left panel of the results page.

                                                 EBSCO                                                     ProQuest

         

The short video below provides a demonstration of how to use limiters to refine a list of search results.

Each resource in a library database is stored in a record.  In addition to the full-text of the resources, searchable Fields are attached that typically include:

  • Author
  • Title
  • Journal title
  • Date of Publication
  • Abstract
  • Subject Headings
  • Publisher

Incorporating Fields into your search can assist in focusing and refining search results by limiting the results to those resources that include specific information in a particular field.

In both EBSCO and ProQuest databases, selecting the Advanced Search option will allow Fields to be included in a search.

For example, in the Advanced Search option in EBSCO's Academic Search Complete database, clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" provides a list of fields that can be searched within that database.  Select the field and enter the information in the text box to the left to use this feature.

Stop words are short, commonly used words--articles, prepositions, and pronouns-- that are automatically dropped from a search.  Typical stop words include:

  • a
  • an
  • and
  • the
  • also
  • but
  • for
  • in
  • is
  • of
  • so
  • which
  • when
  • was

In library databases, a stop word will not be searched even if it is included in a phrase enclosed in quotation marks.  In some instances, a word will be substituted for the stop word to allow for the other words in the phrase to be searched in proximity to one another within the text of the resource.

For example, if you searched company of America, your result list will include these variatons:

  • company in America
  • company of America
  • company for America

This short video demonstrates how to create a search string -- keywords connected with Boolean operators -- to use in a library database search to retrieve relevant resources for any research assignment.

Health Information/Billing and Coding Career Information

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Click the link below to view/save this document as a PDF.

Common Interview Questions

More often than not you will likely encounter a variety of standard interview questions no matter what your degree field and it is best to always be prepared; here are some common questions, as well as tips on how you will want to approach an answer, that you may see during your next interview!

Q. Tell me about yourself
A. This is a dreaded, classic, open-ended interview question and likely to be amount the first. It’s your chance to introduce your qualifications, good work habits, etc. Keep it mostly work and career related.


Q. Why do you want to leave your current job? (Why did you leave your last job?)
A. Be careful with this. Avoid trashing other employers and making statements like, “I need more money.” Instead, make generic statements such as, “It’s a career move."

Q. What are your strengths?
A. Point out your positive attributes related to the job and examples of what you have done.

Q. What are your weaknesses?
A. Everybody has weaknesses, but don’t spend too much time on this one and keep it work related. Along with a minor weakness or two, try to point out a couple of weaknesses that the interview might see as strengths, such as sometimes being a little too meticulous about the quality of your work. (Avoid saying “I work too hard.” It’s a predictable, common answer.) For every weakness, offer a strength that compensates for it.

Q. Which adjectives would you used to describe yourself?
A. Answer with positive, work-oriented adjectives, such as conscientious, hardworking, honest and courteous, plus a brief description or example of why each fits you well.

Q. What do you know about our company?
A. To answer this one, research the company before you interview.

Q. Why do you want to work for us?
A. Same as above. Research the company before you interview. Avoid the predictable, such as, “Because it’s a great company.” Say why you think it’s a great company.

Q. Why should I hire you?
A. Point out your positive attributes related to the job, and the good job you’ve done in the past. Include any compliments you’ve received from management.

Q. What past accomplishments gave you satisfaction?
A. Briefly describe one to three work projects that made you proud or earned you pats on the back, promotions, raises, etc. Focus more on achievement than reward.

Q. What make you work hard?
A. Naturally, material rewards such as perks, salary and benefits come into play. But again, focus more on achievement and the satisfaction n you derive from it.

Q. What type of work environment do you like best?
A. Tailor your answer to the job. For example, if in doing your job you’re required to lock the lab doors and work alone, then indicate that you enjoy being a team player when needed, but also enjoy working independently. If you’re required to attend regular project planning and status meetings, then indicate that you’re a strong team player and like being part of a team.

Q. Why do you want this job?
A. To help you answer this and related questions, study the job ad in advance. But a job ad alone may not be enough, so it’s okay to ask questions about the job while you’re answering. Say what attracts you to the job. Avoid the obvious and meaningless, such as, “I need a job.”

Q. How do you handle pressure and stress?
A. This is sort of a double whammy, because you’re likely already stressed from the interview and the interviewer can see if you’re handling it well or not. Everybody feels stress, but the degree varies. Saying that you whine to your shrink, kick your dog are not good answers. Exercising, relaxing with a good book, socializing with friends or turning stress into productive energy is more along the lines of the “correct” answers.

Q. Explain how you overcame a major obstacle.
A. The interviewer is likely looking for a particular example of your problem-solving skills and pride you show for solving it.

Q. Where do you see yourself five years from now?
A. Explain your career-advancement goals that are in line with the job for which you are interviewing. Your interviewer is likely more interested in how he, she or the company will benefit from you achieving your goals than what you’ll get from it, but it goes hand in hand to a large degree. It’s not a good idea to tell your potential new boss that you’ll be going after his or her job, but it’s ok to mention that you ‘d like to earn a senior or management position.

Q. What qualifies you for this job?
A. Push your skills, experience, education and other qualifications, especially those that match the job description well. Avoid just regurgitating your resume. Explain why.

Q. Why did you choose your college major?
A. The interview is likely fishing to see if you are interested in your field of work or just doing a job to get paid. Explain why you like it. Besides your personal interest, include some rock-solid business reasons that show you have vision and business sense.

Be sure to practice your interview skills before you have to use them.

Log in to Hiration and use the Interview feature to continue to work on your interview skills!

Click the link below to view/save this document as a PDF.

 

It is very important to apply for a variety of positions, along with coding positions. Depending on your location and the type of position you are looking for it can be challenging to find the perfect coding position, after graduation. 

Employers will often select candidates for coding positions that have some experience either in coding or in other areas of the revenue cycle, if they are available,  as their first choice.  Getting experience in an entry level position is important to moving forward to attain your desired position. Obtaining your coding credential can also position you better for these entry level positions.  At the bottom of this page, you'll find the “Revenue Cycle – Activities and Position Responsibilities” as a reminder of other entry level positions to apply for to start building an experience base. 

Remember to explore other job titles to get started in the industry as suggested by the AHIMA Career Map:
https://my.ahima.org/careermap

Hover over the dots on the inner rings to see the suggested entry level jobs, and search those jobs in www.indeed.com and Job Connect https://rasmussen-csm.symplicity.com for your area.  Some employers only post on their own websites, so remember to choose target companies in your area and search their sites directly as well.

Search keywords such as patient services, patient registration, medical claims, and medical records, to name a few. 

Job Sites

There are many job search sites out there for people to tap into in their search from the general job search sites to industry specific sites as well as pharmacy specific staffing agencies.

General Sites
https://www.indeed.com/
https://www.ziprecruiter.com/
https://www.simplyhired.com/

Rasmussen Sites
https://rasmussen-csm.symplicity.com/
https://www.liquidcompass.com/institutions/rasmussen

Health Information/Billing and Coding Related Sites

https://careerassist.ahima.org/
https://www.alliedhealthjobcafe.com/
https://www.healthjobsnationwide.com/
https://www.hospitaljobsonline.com/browse/jobs

https://www.hospitalcareers.com/
http://www.codersdirect.com/jobs 
https://my.ahima.org/careermap

Applying online is only the first step in your job search, and it should NOT be the ONLY step you take. 

Be sure that:

  • Your resume is updated and polished and highlights any documentation, computer, and communication skills you have demonstrated in past jobs or in your education,  ESPECIALLY if health care related.  Check out the health information resume samples in Hiration, choose one and fill in your information and then submit it in the Review Center for review and feedback.  Also take a look at the resume information tabs above in this library guide. Don’t forget the cover letter, and there are cover letter samples in Hiration as well.
  • Keep track of where and when you apply for positions and follow up on them to ensure your application was received.  If you are not hearing back on your applications, make sure you get another resume review by a Career Services Advisor.  There might be something in the way your resume is set up that is getting it kicked our of applicant tracking systems before a human ever sees it!
  • Make sure you are matching key words to a job description where applicable.  Your Career Services Advisor can help you with this as well.

Professional Associations

Professional associations provide individuals with an important aspect needed for today’s working professional; a network. Belonging to a professional association goes much beyond that it provides you with

  • Visibility / Networking
  • Professional Growth / Development
  • Relevance / in the know about industry trends and changes
  • Ability to gain alterative perspectives

Here are just a few professional associations related to the HI industry:

https://www.ahima.org
https://www.amia.org
https://www.cahiim.org/