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*School of Technology*

Library and Learning Services information hub for all things School of Technology.


Software Download Support & Application Access

*Additional Notes for installing Cygwin

  1. When you get to the page about selecting packages, find the one called 'Devel' and click the plus next to it to expand.
  2. Check 'gcc-core', 'gcc-g++', 'gdb', and 'make'. If you don't see this option, continue with the installation normally.
  3. Once complete, open the installer again (run the setup-cygwin file). This is a way to update and add packages, so look for the gcc packages again under 'Devel' when you come to the packages page. If they were not there the first time, they will be this time.
  4. Now, navigate to the folder Cygwin installed. This is usually 'C:/Cygwin' or something similar -- it may have a version number on the end, as well.
  5. Find the folder called 'bin' and open it.  Go to the bar at the top that has the address in it for the folder (again, it will be something along the lines of C:/Cygwin/bin') and copy this address.  Then add this to your environment variables (for additional support on editing path variables, see the link above).
  6. After this, check to make sure they were added successfully by opening the command prompt and typing 'gcc --version', 'g++ --version', and 'gdb --version'. If it tells you the version information, it is complete.  If it gives you an error about it not being a command, double check to make sure the path was updated correctly. If it is, double check that the 'bin' folder in Cygwin contains the modules 'gcc', 'g++', etc. If not, you'll need to go through the Cygwin installation again.
  7. After this, open Netbeans and make sure the gcc and g++ modules were added under 'Tools' and the tab that says c/c++. 
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General Resources: Need to Find an Article, Book, or Website?

Library Databases (Login Required)

Articles from scholarly business journals back as far as 1886 with content from all disciplines of business, including marketing, management, accounting, management information systems, production and operations management, finance and economics.

Business databases, including Entreneurship, from ProQuest.

Coverage includes computer engineering, computer theory & systems, research and development, and the social and professional implications of new technologies. Articles come from more than 1,900 academic journals, trade magazines, and professional publications.

Discovery is an all-in-one search platform. Search most of our academic databases at one time on our familiar, easy-to-use EBSCO platform.

Search 4 databases all at once: Academic Search, Business Source, MasterFile, and Regional Business News.

Computing, telecommunications, art, science and design databases from ProQuest.

Access to almost 9,000 e-books and videos related to the computer sciences, information technology, multimedia, networking, e-commerce, e-business, programming, Java, Adobe, network administration, business intelligence, computer operating systems, and more.

Open Source / Free Access Databases

Programming language discussion forum for C, C++, Java, c#, python, ruby, Assembly, and many more!

A list of resources on how to study and write for Computer Science.

Beginner and intermediate programming tutorials for: 
C programming, C++, C#, JAVA, Objective-C, nasm assembly programming, and many more!

The 3ds Max SDK Programmer's Guide describes how to use the 3ds Max Software Development Kit (SDK) to extend the features, functionality, and interface of 3ds Max primarily using C++.

Learn to code interactively, for free.

Beginner and intermediate tutorials.

Great tutorials for less common subjects, like XML.

Girl Develop It is a nonprofit organization that exists to provide affordable and judgment-free opportunities for women interested in learning web and software development. Through in-person classes and community support, Girl Develop It helps women of diverse backgrounds achieve their technology goals and build confidence in their careers and their everyday lives.

This website is great for projects and professional development.

Powerful collaboration, code review, and code management for open source and private projects.

Learn Python, Ruby, C, and SQL programming.

TechNet is the home for all resources and tools designed to help IT professionals succeed with Microsoft products and technologies.

RAPTOR is a flowchart-based programming environment, designed specifically to help students visualize their algorithms and avoid syntactic baggage. RAPTOR programs are created visually and executed visually by tracing the execution through the flowchart. Required syntax is kept to a minimum. Students prefer using flowcharts to express their algorithms, and are more successful creating algorithms using RAPTOR than using a traditional language or writing flowcharts without RAPTOR.

The Raspberry Pi is a low cost, credit-card sized computer that plugs into a computer monitor or TV, and uses a standard keyboard and mouse. It is a capable little device that enables people of all ages to explore computing, and to learn how to program in languages like Scratch and Python. It’s capable of doing everything you’d expect a desktop computer to do, from browsing the internet and playing high-definition video, to making spreadsheets, word-processing, and playing games.

Interactive SQL tutorial

Stack Overflow  
Stack Overflow is a language-independent collaboratively edited question and answer site for programmers

VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware, targeted at server, desktop and embedded use.



Resources coming soon!


Database Search Tips


  • Library databases are collections of resources, including full-text articles, books, and encyclopedias, that are searchable.
  • Searching library databases is different than searching Google. Best results are achieved when using Keywords linked with Boolean Operators
  • Applying Limiters such as full-text, publication date, resource type, language, geographic location, and subject help to refine search results.
  • Utilizing Phrases or Fields, in addition to an awareness of Stop Words, can focus your search and retrieve more useful results.
  • Have questions? Connect with a Librarian through the Library Live Chat for assistance.

Boolean Operators connect keywords or concepts logically to retrieve relevant articles, books, and other resources.  There are three Boolean Operators:

  • AND
  • OR
  • NOT

Using AND 

  • Narrows search results
  • Connects two or more keywords/concepts
  • All keywords/concepts connected with "and" must be in an article or resource to appear in the search results list

Example: The result list will include resources that include both keywords -- "distracted driving" and "texting" -- in the same article or resource, represented in the shaded area where the circles intersect (area shaded in purple).

Using OR

  • Broadens search results ("OR means more!")
  • Connects two or more synonyms or related keywords/concepts
  • Resources appearing in the results list will include any of the terms connected with the OR connector

Example:  The result list will include resources that include the keyword "texting" OR the keyword "cell phone" (entire area shaded in blue); either is acceptable.

Using NOT

  • Excludes keywords or concepts from the search
  • Narrows results by removing resources that contain the keyword or term connect with the NOT connector
  • Use sparingly

Example: The result list will include all resources that includes the term "car" (green area) but will exclude any resource that includes the term "motorcycle" (purple area) even though the term car may be present in the resource.

A library database searches for keywords throughout the entire resource record including the full-text of the resource, subject headings, tags, bibliographic information, etc.


  • Natural language words or short phrases that describe a concept or idea
  • Can retrieve too few or irrelevant results due to full-text searching (What words would an author use to write about this topic?)
  • Provide flexibility in a search
  • Must consider synonyms or related terms to improve search results
  • TIP: Build a Keyword List

Example:  The keyword list above was developed to find resources that discuss how texting while driving results in accidents.  Notice that there are synonyms (texting and "text messaging"), related terms ("cell phones" and texting), and spelling variations ("cell phone" and cellphone).  Using keywords when searching full-text requires consideration of various words that express an idea or concept.

Subject Headings

  • Predetermined "controlled vocabulary" database editors apply to resources to describe topical coverage of content
  • Can retrieve more precise search results because every article assigned that subject heading will be retrieved.
  • Provide less flexibility in a search
  • Can be combined with a keyword search to focus search results.
  • TIP: Consult database subject heading list or subject headings assigned to relevant resources

Example 1: In EBSCO's Academic Search Complete, clicking on the "Subject Terms" tab provides access to the entire subject heading list used in the database.  It also allows a search for specific subject terms.


Example 2:  A subject term can be incorporated into a keyword search by clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" and selecting "Subject Terms" from the dropdown list.  Also, notice how subject headings are listed below the title of the resource providing another strategy for discovering subject headings used in the database.

When a search term is more than one word, enclose the phrase in quotation marks to retrieve more precise and accurate results.  Using quotation marks around a term will search it as a "chunk," searching for those particular words together in that order within the text of a resource. 


"cell phone"

"distracted driving"

"car accident"

TIP: In some databases, neglecting to enclose phrases in quotation marks will insert the AND Boolean connector between each word resulting in unintended search results.


Truncation provides an option to search for a root of a keyword in order to retrieve resources that include variations of that word.  This feature can be used to broaden search results, although some results may not be relevant.  To truncate a keyword, type an asterisk (*) following the root of the word.

For example:


Library databases provide a variety of tools to limit and refine search results.  Limiters provide the ability to limit search results to resources having specified characteristics including:

  • Full text
  • Resource type
  • Publication date
  • Language
  • Geographic location
  • Subject

In both the EBSCO and ProQuest databases, the limiting tools are located in the left panel of the results page.

                                                 EBSCO                                                     ProQuest


The short video below provides a demonstration of how to use limiters to refine a list of search results.

Each resource in a library database is stored in a record.  In addition to the full-text of the resources, searchable Fields are attached that typically include:

  • Author
  • Title
  • Journal title
  • Date of Publication
  • Abstract
  • Subject Headings
  • Publisher

Incorporating Fields into your search can assist in focusing and refining search results by limiting the results to those resources that include specific information in a particular field.

In both EBSCO and ProQuest databases, selecting the Advanced Search option will allow Fields to be included in a search.

For example, in the Advanced Search option in EBSCO's Academic Search Complete database, clicking on the down arrow next to "Select a Field" provides a list of fields that can be searched within that database.  Select the field and enter the information in the text box to the left to use this feature.

Stop words are short, commonly used words--articles, prepositions, and pronouns-- that are automatically dropped from a search.  Typical stop words include:

  • a
  • an
  • and
  • the
  • also
  • but
  • for
  • in
  • is
  • of
  • so
  • which
  • when
  • was

In library databases, a stop word will not be searched even if it is included in a phrase enclosed in quotation marks.  In some instances, a word will be substituted for the stop word to allow for the other words in the phrase to be searched in proximity to one another within the text of the resource.

For example, if you searched company of America, your result list will include these variatons:

  • company in America
  • company of America
  • company for America

This short video demonstrates how to create a search string -- keywords connected with Boolean operators -- to use in a library database search to retrieve relevant resources for any research assignment.